Projects Printmaking Services Blog About Contact

COVID-19 - Schooling: Long term challenge for Parents

<< Newer | Latest | 19 of 103 | Older >>
Tue 19th May 2020
Blog Categories: Home Schooling | Things we did | My Coronavirus Story | All / Filter

This pandemic has challenged and changed the world. Not just for now, in these near 10 weeks since lock down began - but for the long term until either the virus wears itself out or a suitable vaccine is found. As our neighbour said tonight, there isn't going to be a normal for a long time. This is challenging for everyone, not least parents - we have a just 7 year old in Year 2, and 9 year old in Year 4 in two different schools (infant and junior).

When will they go back to school?

Today we had a letter from our 9 year old's school saying that Year 6 (10-11 year olds) may go back part time after half term (early June), but that crucially they don't have to go back, and will go back half a class at a time sticking together with 1 teacher. They can't guarantee social distancing rules of 2m apart too - between students and their teacher.

They don't know when other years will go back. The problem is the school buildings were built in the 19th Century, they weren't designed for social distancing and you can't put 30 children and teacher in the room all 2m apart. It doesn't work.

The reality is that our children may not go back full time for a long time. They might have a bit of time at school if Year 6 works near the end of term (but I doubt it, it is asking a lot of the children, and not everyone may want their children to go anyway). But what about September? The virus is unlikely to magically disappear by then, we will be in the same boat. Are we going to sit here doing home schooling for months to come, or into 2021? 2022? The 1918/1919 pandemic took a long time but there again it infected so many and ran out of people to infect some say.

When will they go back to school?

Today we had a letter from our 9 year old's school saying that Year 6 (10-11 year olds) may go back part time after half term (early June), but that crucially they don't have to go back, and will go back half a class at a time sticking together with 1 teacher. They can't guarantee social distancing rules of 2m apart too - between students and their teacher.

They don't know when other years will go back. The problem is the school buildings were built in the 19th Century, they weren't designed for social distancing and you can't put 30 children and teacher in the room all 2m apart. It doesn't work.

The reality is that our children may not go back full time for a long time. They might have a bit of time at school if Year 6 works near the end of term (but I doubt it, it is asking a lot of the children, and not everyone may want their children to go anyway). But what about September? The virus is unlikely to magically disappear by then, we will be in the same boat. Are we going to sit here doing home schooling for months to come, or into 2021? 2022? The 1918/1919 pandemic took a long time but there again it infected so many and ran out of people to infect some say.

It is hard for everyone

The children are missing out on so much - the learning, and the social interaction. Some may say we are all in the same boat, but I'd say we are all in boats of different types. Some are learning more than others - there is a big social divide opening up.

You may say it is great my wife is a junior school teacher - and yes it is - but she is teaching via Zoom most of the time, and isn't able to sit teaching them. And whilst my wife teaches via Zoom we sit quietly doing our thing - children learning (headphones on often), me at this computer. I help them of course, but we mostly sit and whisper. We have a teacher in the house but they can't be taught by her because she is teaching other people's children.

It is hard for everyone.

It is hard for everyone

The children are missing out on so much - the learning, and the social interaction. Some may say we are all in the same boat, but I'd say we are all in boats of different types. Some are learning more than others - there is a big social divide opening up.

You may say it is great my wife is a junior school teacher - and yes it is - but she is teaching via Zoom most of the time, and isn't able to sit teaching them. And whilst my wife teaches via Zoom we sit quietly doing our thing - children learning (headphones on often), me at this computer. I help them of course, but we mostly sit and whisper. We have a teacher in the house but they can't be taught by her because she is teaching other people's children.

It is hard for everyone.

How will we cope?

We will cope because we have to. In the past 10 weeks, the children and I have left the house twice each only - we have a big enough garden, we don't need to leave the house. It is better that way. The children video chat with their friends and grandparents etc., and that is working well, we play card games sometimes, we make the most of what we have. And we sit and learn.

If we are going to have to do this part time or full time for months or potentially year(s) to come then we and society will have to find a way to cope. We will just have to do things differently. Create a new normal.

How will we cope?

We will cope because we have to. In the past 10 weeks, the children and I have left the house twice each only - we have a big enough garden, we don't need to leave the house. It is better that way. The children video chat with their friends and grandparents etc., and that is working well, we play card games sometimes, we make the most of what we have. And we sit and learn.

If we are going to have to do this part time or full time for months or potentially year(s) to come then we and society will have to find a way to cope. We will just have to do things differently. Create a new normal.


<< Newer | Latest | 19 of 103 | Older >>
Blog Categories: Home Schooling | Things we did | My Coronavirus Story | All / Filter

All text, images and illustrations © Copyright David Rodgers 2020 unless stated otherwise. No copying in part or whole without written permission.

Disclaimer

All articles made are based on my own personal experience, and may not be suitable for everyone. They are not to be taken as formal advice; always seek personal professional advice before doing anything, especially if it is health related, or might affect your health.

Where links are provided to external sites, I am not responsible for the content of these sites.

All content is believed to be correct at time of writing, but policies and prices change over time, and this article is not updated to reflect this. Double check all facts before making any decisions.





Bucks Printmaker Blog
Contact   Instagram rss